David Crozier: M Club Hall Of Fame Inductee

https://bearcatsports.com/news/2019/10/10/general-david-crozier-m-club-hall-of-fame-inductee.aspx

The Class of 2019 will be inducted into the M-Club Hall of Fame during the annual festivities on Fri., Oct. 25 in the J.W. Jones Student Union Ballroom and will be recognized during the Homecoming football game on Sat., Oct. 26. Tickets for the Friday evening banquet are $25 each and may be purchased by contacting Kiersten Orton (korton@nwmissouri.edu) in the athletics office at 660-562-1977. Seating for the event is limited and the deadline to reserve your spot at the banquet is Oct. 18, or until tickets are sold out.

2019 M Club Hall of Fame Announcement

By Trent Spinner
Athletic Communications/Media Relations Student Assistant

In this year’s M-Club Hall of Fame class, there is one person that impacted and grew with Northwest Missouri State through ages of work. David Crozier, a teacher and an athletic administrator, forced progress and helped with functions of the athletic department through four decades of determination and now his memory will be immortalized forever.

Few can equal the passion that David Crozier had for Northwest. His tenure of 42 years of service (1940-1982), puts him among the longest-serving professors to ever teach at the University. The accomplishments that he produced in the classrooms only transferred to his role in helping the athletic program.

David Crozier had a goal to serve the student body and bleed green all at the same time. So it only made sense that he played the role as faculty athletic representative for the MIAA and sat on the University’s athletic committee for 30-plus years.

“From what I understand, he would deal with eligibility for every sport,” Ken Crozier said. “He was the one that had to certify that they were academically eligible.”

His love for Northwest athletics began with his collegiate career, when he ventured from near Detroit, Michigan, to small town Maryville to attend college and begin his journey as a life-long Bearcat. He felt so at home at Northwest that he accepted a job after graduating in 1940.

David Crozier’s relationship with Bearcat athletics blossomed at that point, and for the rest of his life he was intertwined in the growth of the program. His need to be involved was not only felt by his impact working with student athletes, but always remaining within 100 yards of the football stadium.

“There used to be a faculty house on either side of what became the Mary Linn Performing Arts Center. Now there is some tailgating there and we probably lived less than a 100 feet from the old press box in the stadium,” Ken Crozier said. “They lived there from the mid or late 1940s until 1955, then we moved to 918 College Avenue, the white house that overlooks the football field and gymnasium. We were always within a 100 yards of the stadium.”

David Crozier’s induction into the M-Club is only complete by his son, Ken Crozier, making the trip from North Carolina to represent him. David Crozier made sure his family lived alongside the University as Ken Crozier followed his dad’s footsteps and was raised as a Bearcat.

David Crozier made sure that his family bled green and even had his two sons attend Northwest (Ken and James). James, his eldest son, passed away earlier this year, but his youngest son, Ken, still bares the family’s love for the Bearcats from streaming all the events to having season tickets.

“One of my children, one of my brother’s children, my mother, my dad, my brother and I and my wife we all attended or graduated from Northwest,” Ken Crozier said. “I live in North Carolina, but I have season tickets so when I come, I have my seat, I say that so you understand we are big Bearcat supporters.”

David Crozier’s love for the school was legendary and it seems fit to put him alongside the rest of the Northwest greats. For his family, it’s an honor and they are grateful that David is getting recognized for his achievements within the athletic department.

“As his family we knew that dad was very dedicated to his profession,” Ken Crozier said. “It means a whole lot to us that his efforts are being recognized.”